Going behind the scenes of one of the world’s most admirable professions. 

Sometimes we forget that there are so many heroes in our midst—folks quietly going about daily duties that save lives and positively impact our immediate community and the world beyond. These hardworking souls are brave, wise, kind, humble and stronger than often seems humanly possible. 

We recently spoke with one such Seattleite—Jodie David, a nurse in the Supportive and Palliative Care service at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. We are so grateful for her work and wanted to share her story with you.

Creating a level playing field for all.

If ever we’re feeling down about the affairs of the world, it helps to look toward the do-gooders who carry an optimism that affects us, too. We can’t help it; it’s contagious. We recently caught up with one such local—Kirby Winfield, Auction Chair and Board Chair Elect for Special Olympics Washington.

Eating well and doing good, a Q+A.

There seems no better time than the very end of Hunger Action Month™ to spotlight Erin Baker (of Erin Baker’s Wholesome Baked Goods). As the name might suggest, Erin’s company aims to bake with simple, all-natural, whole food ingredients while changing childhood obesity “one breakfast at a time.” Her products are incredibly tasty (trust us!), her passion is palpable, and her motto is simple: “Small acts of compassion, when multiplied, will change the world.”

We are excited to announce a new Culture Dose column subset, “Local Heroes,” to showcase do-gooders in the Seattle area and their work within our community. Our first column features Nathan and Emma Welch, who founded Rites of Passage as a way to continue their shared commitment to community advocacy, giving back and local outreach. They’ve thoughtfully designed expedition-based wilderness therapy programs for adolescents ages 11-17 and adults ages 18-30+ who struggle with such emotional and behavioral concerns as ODD, ADHD, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, mood disorders and substance abuse. “A boot camp alternative,” they explain, “…our programs are therapeutic, not punitive.”